Growing Tomatoes

Did you know that tomatoes are the most popular vegetable grown
in backyard gardens? There are about 7,500 different varieties, they take
anywhere from 55 to 100 days to grow, and are an excellent source of
vitamin A and C. They are fairly easy to grow and can become a family
project for all to get involved in and enjoy.



Getting Started
Tomatoes
grow well in soil that drains well and receives at least 6 hours of
sunlight daily, so be sure and pick out an area that will be best suited
for them.

It’s all about the dirt
After
determining a good planting site and the variety of tomato you will
grow, you will need to prepare your soil by removing any foreign
materials such as branches, rocks and general trash. Make sure you have
the best soil possible. If needed, visit your local nursery and ask them
for a good quality planting soil to work into your garden soil such as our Natural Guard 100% Organic Garden Soil

As
you begin to transplant your tomatoes from container to garden, plant
them on raised beds of dirt at least 6 inches high and make the holes 3
to 4 inches deep or slightly deeper than the containers they came in. Be
sure to leave each plant at least 2 feet apart from each other so they
have room to reach for the sunshine. If they are tall or leggy plants,
you can lay them over into the soil, cover with more soil, and gently
work the stalk with a 90 degree angle upwards.

Let’s feed it!
Using a good quality fertilizer will give you the results you are looking for. Our ferti-lome Tomato and Vegetable Food
with a 7-22-8 analysis with trace elements will provide your tomato
plants with all the essential nutrients necessary for a tomato with
better, juicier flavor and produce a bigger harvest with improved color
and taste. Always follow label directions.

A Little Water Please
Be
sure to water the plants slowly and deeply to help develop a strong
root system. Don’t let them wilt as this will affect the yield and
quality of the plant, thus making the plants weak and susceptible to
disease and insect problems. For best results, water in the morning when
it’s cooler.

To cage or not to cage
You can let the tomatoes grow on the ground or support them with stakes or cages.

It’s picking time
For
best quality, pick tomatoes when at full color. If you harvest or pick
them before they become ripe, let them ripen at room temperature. You
can refrigerate after they reach full color.

What’s bugging you?
Chances
are you’ll need an insecticide/fungicide product to help control those
pests that will come looking for a meal in your garden. Whether it’s a
leaf chewing or sucking insect, or a fungus problem, visit your
local garden center and ask for the ferti-lome and Hi-Yield brands you can trust.